SUNDAY MORNING MEETINGS

10am - Crow Lane, Rochester

Check the What's on page for details

 

 

HALL HIRE

Rooms to hire for schools and events

See the Get in Touch page

COFFEE SHOP OPENING HOURS

Monday - Friday 10am - 3pm

Saturday 10.30am - 3pm

See menu and details on the Coffeeshop page

ADDRESS

The Moat House
8 Crow Lane, Rochester,
Kent ME1 1RF

for members area

LEGAL

© Rochester Baptist Church 2016

Registered charity 1130518

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Our history

Read a quick summary, starting from the very beginning...

The site was occupied by two houses, one of which was named the 'Moat House'.
 
The two lower rooms of the Moat House were converted to one and used as a temporary place to meet.
March 1887
October 1887
 5
 20
November 1888
8th March 1888
31st May 1889
25th June 1890
17th September 1890
George Anderson Millar, a student pastor from Spurgeon College, London began running evening services in the Institute on Strood High Street.
 
Rev. Charles Spurgeon paid all expenses for the first 3 months.
A Sunday School was established.
A committee of 5 were elected to oversee the work of the congregation.
Soon the people outgrew the building and moved to larger premises across the river in Rochester.
Rochester Baptist Church was officially formed.
Twenty people signed the Covenant.
The meetings were held in rented premises to the rear of Eastgate House, just off Rochester High Street.
Plans were drawn up to purchase a site on which to build a chapel.
Despite opposition, a site in Crow Lane was eventually purchased for £1,000.
Millar was ordained and inducted as Pastor of RBC. 
Work began on the school chapel (Institute) building.
The church family began using the completed building. 
The congregation continued to grow so plans were drawn up for a chapel that would seat 700 people.
The estimated cost of the new building was £3,600 which was a huge sum for a small church.
 
Millar travelled over 10,000 miles to raise money for the cost of building.
Building work began.
The new chapel was opened.
There was a gradual decline in attendance during this period and the buildings needed much repair. 
 
By the late 1970s, the future of RBC was in question.
Despite this, the church faithfully employed another full-time Pastor.
11th March 1907
23rd October 1907
1920                     1970s
A Christian bookshop and cafe were established, with the aim of offering good quality Christian literature to the public.
1980
RBC joined the FIEC,
the Fellowship of Independent Evangelical Churches.
The bookshop and cafe were modernised and disabled access improved.
Regular membership is growing at 80+ adults.
Over 40 children attend the Sunday kids' sessions each week.
 
RBC is now overseen by a leadership team of both employed and volunteer men and women.
The church family recognise the huge privilege of having a building so close to the High Street and continue to pray for new opportunities to use it for God and the wider community.
2016 +
2002